Wednesday, June 6, 2012

SWIM TRAGEDY

Our sandbars here are enticing, but they're dangerous. The quickly rising sea means currents run so hard between them and the shore that people can be swept away. That's what happened this past weekend.

A thirty-year-old army sergeant and his children were on the sandbar as the tide began to come in. They floundered in the suddenly-deep water between the beach and sandbar, but bystanders pulled the children to safety. Unfortunately, a wave knocked the father down before rescuers could get to him. They did recover his body last night when fisherman at the pier saw the current carrying it past. Not much consolation, but it does mean some closure for the family.

Drownings like this happen a lot down here. It seems the currents claim someone every few years. The lifeguards leave at four; this drowning happened shortly after. There are also signs cautioning people about the currents, but I'm not sure they're prominent or explicit enough. People don't understand that going onto the sandbars during the rising tide means they can be stranded with a rushing stream of water between them and the shore.

Thinking of the widow and her children breaks your heart.

4 comments:

  1. This is just awful. It's like getting bit by a snake. Just being in the wrong place at the wrong time and ignorant of mother nature.

    I was raised at the Pacific ocean, and we were free to wander the shoreline rocks pretty much at will. But one of the few instructions I ever had from my mother was to respect the sea because it's always in charge. When I was about twenty I got caught in a riptide and realized just how insignificant I was. If God hadn't released me, I would have disappeared and nobody on shore would have ever noticed.

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    1. You were fortunate. Two more people were rescued in the past few days by a boat rental operative who risked his life to go out to them.

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  2. The tides are rough up in the Bay of Fundy, and depending on the time of year, straying too far from the access points to safe ground can either mean you're stuck somewhere along the line, or you risk drowning.

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    1. Same here. Except you don't get stuck. The tide comes in over the sandbars so if you don't make it back before it starts coming in, you're likely to be in serious trouble.

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Thanks for commenting!